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tunes. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is "gps global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you today from london. happy new year. on today's show, we'll look ahead at what 2013 might bring around the world. i have a great panel richard haass, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
that the united states will come to a good resolved in negotiations. yet, even if they downgrade the united states as the second rating agency that would do so, it would not have the same kind of tsunami affect as the first downgrading by standard and poor's in the summer of 2011. despite all problems, the united states is still being seen as a safe investment. the market share is treading water rafter that enormous price rise on the day's first trade of the year. >> treading water and it barely makes it for the markets in europe with a lot of profit- taking going on out of those big gains the day before after they cheered on the deal in the u.s.. the selling was widely expected. dax close to 8000 than it is now down about 0.3%. over to new york where the dow jones is down just slightly. the euro trading down as well. $1.3338. one crucial factor remains fairly strong, the labor market. the picture is mixed. >> germany and the with more people working than ever before, but more people are also looking for a job. figures showing unemployment rose slightly for the ninth month in a row. >> the line's
years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. and we'll be sharing what that means through a new campaign we are launching over the next few weeks, which will focus on raising understanding of the unique and foundational role of the u.s. oil and natural gas industry and what it means to our economy. what it means for our communities, and for o- america's lives, for revenue, for refining, and what it means ultimately to job creation and economic recovery. oil and natural gas companies support 9.2 million jobs and could easily support an additional 1.4 million
by an unmanned u.s. plane. he was one of the top commanders. it was part of the tribal region where the united states has been targeting insurgent leaders. he has been killed with five others. we are joined from islamabad for more on who the man was. >> he was a senior commander from the south region who was active in carrying out attacks inside afghanistan. he made no secret of it. he was a respected member of the tribe. the tribe lives on both sides of the border. he offered a great help to the pakistani authorities when he took on the fallen fighters. he moved them from their territory and it enabled the pakistani military to go on a major offensive against another try. an important figure -- against another try and. tribe.her >> the strikes appear to be undermining efforts to come to a truce in the region. >> it was not just been thrown strike that killed him, but another strike that had not far away. there were two drones strikes. 10 people killed and four other people killed. a rescue is underway to see if there are any survivors. there have been questions about the thrones strikes. paki
science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e.m. fields. we cannot continue to ignore this problem. it's that simple. continued in action -- especially since the american enterprise institute has confirmed 100 foreign-born workers with s.t.e.m. degrees create an average of 262 additional jobs for nativeborn workers. let me tell you, these countries would love to have the american educated ph.d's and other highly educated individuals return and boost their economies. not only from their acquired skills, but also by creating these new jobs as well.
with the independence army. the united nations and the -- they are deeply troubled by reports of new airstrikes in the area. , we spoke to a representative -- >> we spoke to a representative of the independent army who said he could hear and see two fighter jets from the myanmar army flying overhead. he said they had attacked a kia outpost. this is an area which is similar to the area that was attacked by myanmar helicopters and fighter jets last week. there was a confusing situation last week when the myanmar government appeared to initially deny those airstrikes had taken place. a couple of days later, they admitted they did happen, but they happened in self-defense. the use of air power against the rebels is certainly an escalation in what has been a very long-running war. >> dozens of protesters are gathered outside the headquarters of one of china's most liberal newspapers. they are calling for the resignation of the provincial propaganda chief. the protest began after they replaced a new years letter to readers -- new year's letter to readers. isgle's executive chairman in north korea in
and the government is getting violent. the united states is getting involved. they're threatening to take control of the entire country. the militants' move prompted france to take action over the weekend. they put boots on the ground and went all in, bombing rebel training camps and other targets. so what will the united states do? a pentagon official told me this afternoon that the u.s. will participate in mali, but, and i want to make sure i put quotes around this, it's still deciding what that looks like. when we went to the mali border last summer, i saw first hand how dangerous the situation is. today, we spoke to some of our sources on the ground, including the military commander of the al qaeda's linked group. he told us that the militants are, in his words, excited and would welcome u.s. troops on the ground. he also said the french bombs have killed civilians and that france is signing a death warrant for french people around the world, opening the gates of hell. omar said the militants will fight to the end and this will be a long war, more dangerous than afghanistan or iraq. we also s
of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running sht. >> rose: other topics included the ongoing debate on gun control, and the lack of diversity in the second term appoint ease. joining me from washington al hunt of bloomberg news and from the white house major garrett of cbs news. thank you. al better i start with you. characterize for me the president in temperment and in words on the bet dealin dealing -- ceiling. >> charlie, i think he realizes he has a winning hand substantively on this and there will be caveats in just a moment. i was truck,-- struck, however that what this really, his last press conference his first term showed he should have had a lot more than he did. because he's rusty. if was almost analogy can be made to that first debate. he went on too long for a while. he stepped on his narrative some. and if you read t i think reads better than it looked. the reason i say i think he believes he has the upper hand on the debt sealing is because republicans have a losing hand. they don't want to hold the full faith an
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
responds likewise. delegates at the united nations have agreed to expand sanctions on north korea. the security council condemned a rocket launch there last month. chinese delegates have long provided diplomatic protection for their north korean allies. but they approved the resolution and members adopted it unanimously. the statement criticizes the launch as a violation of previous resolutions. the security council will add organizations and individuals to lists of existing sanctions and freeze their assets. the north korean space agency is among those named. >> today's resolution also makes clear that if north korea chooses again to defy the international community such as by conducting another launch or a nuclear test then the council will take significant action. >> american delegates told the chinese the resolution would not bring in new measures but would build existing sanctions. those assurances convinced the chinese to approve the resolution. >> and we believe that there's opportunity for all stakeholders of the peninsula, korean peninsula, to start a diplomatic track an
. looking at conflicts of the organization's and workspace united states, often not the most crucial to those on the ground and sometimes it is difficult to understand. those other questions that they ask. who can i trust? to can i not trust? sow developed a policy that is the question we have to ask what about the relationship of foreign fighters? what kind? overtime there is a pretty good relationship without chitin and i imagine they would point* to the relationship over time that they clashed repeatedly with millicent's and as a result he clashed with other taliban elements in south waziristan. stability of that organization we have to get down to the fine point* how he frames his politics. for. have aggressively do they target people in afghanistan? this is pretty obvious. he supported troops from afghanistan but that is not the case for every militant network fare pretty -- many criminal networks that fought other militant organizations. it is a key question for policy going forward have the pakistan restate looks at the organization's. it is important to us but not the i s i h
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
, the government of the united states under the constitution is a limited government and the constitution is to protect the people from the government, not for the government to give people rights and powers that the government then, in turn, could take away. on the other hand, the constitution does give broad powers to the federal government but it separates them among branches and between the states and the national government. the framers believed these structures would adequately control the government so as to protect individual liberty. but the american people disagreed. they believed that the constitution gave the federal government so much power that it could be tyrannical and violate individual rights. so as a condition of ratification, they demanded and received assurances that a bill of rights would be added to the constitution. now, each of those rights, including the second amendment dealing with guns, was adopted to yet further limit government power and to protect individual rights. in other words, the people that wrote the constitution in 1787, in the spirit that they beli
diversity, that we have not seen before in the united states congress. interesting statistic is that among democrats in the house, white males will not be the majority any more of the democratic conference. that's the first time that has happened. we have an african-american republican appointed to the united states senate. that the first time we have had an african-american republican in the senate since 1970s, early 1980s i believe. clearly you are looking at a different group of folks in terms who've is represented up here. the problem is, they are having the same problems to deal with once they're sworn in. we have seen the swearings in going on all day, sue. >> thank you very much. congress might be be able to get much done but ty can get it done. he is at manager of the year conference and awards in chicago. ty? >> sue, i was just thinking, if you don't have to be a member of house to be speaker of house be i nominate jon stewart. >>> we are back for manager of the year awards presentation. basically golden globes, oscars, emmys of the hedge funds business. who would have turned a $1
hands. when it comes to america's role in world affairs, i know we agree it is critical the united states remain fully engaged. we project the power of our military strength when necessary and the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and demands we will face. there is no doubt he will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done in the senate and the chairmanship of this committee is an anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and godspeed in many journeys that lie ahead. we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me recognize senator corker. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me thank are three distinguished guests. i want to thank you for your courtesy over the last six years as i served on this committee. i looked at you and been nominated for this as someone who has lived their entire life for this moment of being able to
to help create innovation focused jobs again in the united states. as you know all too well, madam president, our economic recovery has been slower than we would hope, although it's been steady, there are still far too many americans out of work. in my home state of delaware, more than 30,000. but we are building our way ba back. so the task before us is to think not just about an immediate economic crisis but to take a breath i think and instead focus strategically on the long-term fewer, to take -- long-term future, to take an account of what kind of economy we want to build for our children, for our grandchildren, for the america of today and tomorrow. the engine of our nation's greatest economic successes has always been innovation. from the light bulb to the search engine, american inventors and innovators, those who've taken risks and started companies, have created jobs by the thousands and changed lives by the millions. but before new ideas can scale to market and reach out to change the world, they first have to start in a lab or garage. i know from my own eight years in t
, and they, too, haddock units. and they had library records, and they had roles, and he was able to see there that john locke was reading roger williams. and if thomas jefferson was reading locke, we start to see how these ideas were transatlantic, were moving all over the world well before we think of the global exchange that we have today. these other books show us how people were living, how they were interacting with each other. they also show us how we shaped our economy as we, again, struggle with how we redefine ourselves to new economies, to new political structures throughout the world. we can come to places like this, and we can understand how adjustments were made, how a community could redefine itself and take advantage of opportunities that might not have existed before. and what i love so much about libraries and about history and about research is five people can look at the same book and walk away with five completely different stories and interpretations. seeing what's important to them and making it into something that is relevant for an unimaginable number of commitme
, as well as the united states drone strikes in the area, not as much attention has been paid to the actual people who live there, in their point of view. in our public opinion survey, while not starving and some of its conclusions, i think it's an insight into where future policy might head. here's some of the key findings, and their set forth in the book in detail. nearly nine out of every 10 residents in the fatah region opposed u.s. military operation. this is not a few that slightly held. in fact, passionately and intensely help but here's one measure of why. when only one in 10 people, flat top, flat top, one and 10 full-time residents, in tribal areas think that suicide attacks are ever justified against pakistani military forces, almost six in 10 believe these attacks are justified against the united states military. much of the antipathy towards the united states stems from one cause and one cause really only. and that against cia director jon strikes on militants living in the area. more than three quarters of fatah residents oppose these strikes. however, this opposition to ameri
for a bill they've already racked up. if congress refuses to give the united states the ability to pay the bills on time the consequence force the entire global economy could be catastrophic. last time congress threat bd this course of action our entire economy suffered for it. our families and our businesses connot afford that dangerous game again. i congratulate the newly sworn in members of congress and i look forward to working with the new congress in a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interest of our country boof the interest of party i'm convinced we can cut spending and raise revenue a mariner that protect it is middle class and we can step up to meet the important business that awaits us this year creating jobs boosting income fixing our infrastructure promoting our independence while protecting our planet. educating our children and shielding them from the horrors of gun violence. these aren't just things we should do they're things we must do and i'll fight as hard as i know how to get them done. happy new year. >> i'm congressman dave camp from the fourth district of mich
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
to zero, but and forth. -- back and forth. it is not so much the economic constraint of the united states, or the political reality. it should be a combination of all three. first, a definition of the mission. what the united states wants to accomplish in afghanistan. if the mission is clearly defined, we can consider this will take so many troops. i know that definition is a counter-terrorism presence, not so much counterinsurgency, which could be carried out by afghans. the question is, who is the terrorist? it is the taliban included or not? i do not want to run over my time, but i can discuss this if there is more interest. >> i think we have a comprehensive picture. you mentioned for transitions. what would be the most helpful thing, in your perspective, for all or any of the particular transitions that outsiders could entertain? >> the most important role the international community generally could play is an economic transition. that makes the political transition possible, and the security transition sustainable. for this, what is needed is working more closely to reintegrate the
on tackling gun violence in the united states. in a welcome message to his guests, biden vowed president obama would take meaningful action through executive order if need be. >> we are here today to deal with the problem that requires immediate action, urgent action. the president and i are determined to take action. this is not an exercise in a photo opportunity just ask you what your opinions are. we're reaching out to all parties on whatever side of this debate you fall. but the president is going to t. there are executive orders, executive action that can be taken. we have not decided what that is yet, that we are compiling it with the help of the attorney general and the rest of the cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is required. >> vice president said to me today with representatives of the national rifle association as well as gun retailers, including walmart. new york governor andrew cuomo has unveiled what he's billed as the toughest gun control legislation in the country in the aftermath of last month's newtown massacre in neighboring connecticut. in an impassi
if the president won't negotiate on the debt ceiling. and one of our guests says the next president of the united states will be black. and why one politician accused of a crime was stripped and beaten. we'll show it to you. let's go "outfront." >>> good friday evening, everyone. i'm erin burnette. "outfront" tonight, on the brink of battle. a threat today from a top republican to shut down the government if president obama refuses to negotiate over the debt ceiling. the second most powerful republican in the senate, minority whip john cornyn of texas wrote in an op-ed today, president obama needs to take note of this reality and put forward a plan to avoid it immediately. will those threats work? a senior democrat says if the republicans don't want to raise the debt ceiling, it will be on their shoulders. >> risking government shutdown, risking not raising the debt ceiling is playing with fire. >> playing with fire. douglas holtz-eakin is the former director of the congressional budget office. robert reich is a former u.s. labor secretary and author of a book that explains how we all feel these
in united states called burning springs because the of naturally occurring methane in the water. in pennsylvania, the first case they had of water catching on fire was in 1670. it is been happening for a while. they have had documented cases in colorado of wells catching .ire since the 20's this has caused a panic nonetheless. it does become a celebrity cause to talk about how fracking is going to mess up all the drinking water, all of our sins are going to catch on fire. it is amazing to me -- sinks are going to catch on fire. it is amazing to me how much money they have to put towards this propaganda. they have enough money to advertise. i do not think we ever had an exxon ad in the national review. >> >> promised land, the primary backers was uae. >> why would they want to do that? [laughter] >> protecting what they have. did not want to see the technology that we have here come see them over there. >> a lot of people do not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-suffici
in recent days may have made the situation worse. japan, the united states and other nations use strict environmental regulations to control the levels of fine particulate matter. the chinese government set its own standards in february of last year after a wave of criticism both at home and abroad. but public discontent continues to grow, mainly in urban areas, as authorities in china struggle to clear the air. >>> parents wo who last their children in a mass shooting in connecticut are demanding stricter gun control. the gunman killed 20 children and six adults. sandy hook elementary school remain closed. stu students returned to class earlier this month at a different building. >> this is a promise to turn the conversations into action. things must change. this is the time. this is a promise we make to our precious children. >> i would respectfully request that every parent in this country who hears these words simply pause for a moment and think, ask yourself, what is it worth doing to keep your children safe. >> president barack obama says he plans to announce new gun control measu
come to the united states who had come out first to see the second lady and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on her travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sensed her sincerity and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party the nixons were at and the engagement they were going to were not as important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. in the greater scheme of things, this is really a small act. but it left a lasting impression both on the woman involved, the indian woman involved, and on the women at the table that she was eventually seated at. that's how we actually know about the event, is through a letter that someone who she ended up sitting with responded and wrote to pat later about it. for pat politics was her job and one she didn't always enjoy. while on occasion she was proud of her work in helping to raise funds for the party, she found many of
policy. we don't live in a free market in the united states, we live in a mixed economy. it varies by industry. technology which by the way has done very well, the most regulated industry in the world this financial-services. that's where we had our biggest problem, not surprisingly because that's where we had our biggest problems. second of the policy created a massive disinvestment. they got focused on the residential real-estate market. the global burst as all due. at the large financial institutions that calls wall street and made serious mistakes. if i had been in charge of a but let the institutions fail. however the states were secondary and in the context of an incentive by government policy. almost everything we've done in the financial crisis started was a long time period even things that might be helping a low but in the short term will dramatically reduce the standard of living in the long-term. fifth point even though there's and a lot of economic financial causes the real cost to the real cure philosophical, and i'm going to focus on that in my presentation, and then
of the united states, a cold spell have been talking about for days has finally ended and temperatures are coming back to normal. i want to show you what we can see as weak note toward monday. getting above freezing, a normal temperature there. toward atlanta, a partly cloudy day. focus" only on the link tv. >> a reminder now of the top stories -- at least 230 people have died in a fire at night club in southern brazil. witnesses say musicians that off fireworks on stage and some victims were trampled to death in the panic to escape. in egypt, six people had died in violence during funerals for the more than 30 people killed in clashes on saturday. french and forces in mali fighting against the rebels are on the outskirts of the city of timbuktu. our correspondent is traveling with the french military on the road to timbuktu. >> french forces are amassing in this depot just to the southwest of timbuktu. we have seen troops from all here as well, preparing weaponry and assembling heavy guns. these are the strongest signals we have had get that the final event on timbuktu is imminent. th
units worldwide last year, up 22% from the previous year. the sales include vehicles made by daihatsu and hino motors. u.s. general motors came in second selling about 9.28 million units. germany's volkswagen ranked third selling just over 9 million units. in 2011 toyota ranked third due to the impact of the march 11th disaster in northeastern japan but its sales recovered last year, especially due to stronger demand in southeast asia and north america. government subsidies for buyers of eco friendly vehicles also pushed up sales in japan. toyota says it hopes to do even better this year. it's aiming to sell over 9.9 million units. >>> an expert panel of japan's nuclear regulation authority says a nuclear reactor at air power plant could be on active fault. the experts drafted a report on a newly found fault under the plant site. the experts draft ad report on a newly found fault under a plant site in fukushima prefecture on monday. it said it may have moved 10,000 to 130,000 years ago. the draft says the fracture's direction and other factors suggest that another fault could be direc
directly at the united states. the communist nation says it plans to carry out a nuclear test and more long-range rocket launches. >> state media made the announcement that north korea was locked in an all-out war of confrontation with its arch enemy, the united states. >> it's archenemy, the united states. >> stephen: whoa, archenemies? folks, this is a serious increase in hostilities and i cannot sit idly by while they make these threats. so i want to say something right now to north korea. heeeeey. [ laughter ] heeeeey. [ laughter ] democratic people's republic of korea. we need to talk. [ laughter ] look, uhh, we're flattered that you think of us as archenemies, but that's kind of taking our relationship to a whole other level. kind of a big commitment and i'm not sure we're ready for that. [ laughter ] i mean we just got out of a 50-year archenemy thing with the soviets and that was really special. [ laughter ] you're lucky if you hate somebody like that once in a lifetime. [ laughter ] and since then we thought we'd play the field. tried to have some quickies with iraq and afghanistan
this morning. today on the calendar, we have mcdonald's, united technologies, motorola solutions, coach, and wellpoint. just a few of the names we'll be watching. >>> then after the bell this afternoon, you've got apple coming out. still the world's most valuable public company. the stock fell below $500 last week for the first time in 11 months. shares have fallen nearly 30% since peaking at $705.07 on september 21. that, by the way, the day of the iphone's release. joe? >> okay. thanks. i was saying -- january 23. you know this is the last day it will be january 23 until a year, until next year. you know how we've been saying that about these things, palindromes, we won't see another in -- 2002 for 90 years. at least 12 months before it is january 23. let's head to the economic forum. world economic forum. andrew messaged me with that fact. he is standing by in davos. and andrew, we don't know who you have for guests today. we're more interested in obviously the fashion forward looks you're going to be bringing us. hopefully you're going to have -- >> yeah -- >> every hour. you'll be,
of the united states will be black. does it add up? >> and why one politician acruised of a crime was strip and beaten. we'll show it to you. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good friday evening, everyone. i'm erin burnette. "outfront" tonight, on the brink of battle. a threat from the government to shut down government if president obama refuses to tell gauche yat. president obama needs to take note of it and put forward a plan and note it immediately. will those threats work? a senior democrat says if the republicans don't want to raise the debt ceiling it will be on their shoulders. >> risking government shutdown, risking not raszing the debt creeling is playing with fire. >> playing with fire. he's the former direct over the congressional republican office and beyond outrage what has gone wrong with our economy, our democracy and how to fix it. i show you have solutions to solve the crisis we all fear. let's start with you. in john corn anyoneyncornyn's s shut down the government, what kind of outcome is that? >> it's terrible. it's actually saying to the c
. and the pass and review, essentially, is the presidential escort unit which is comprised of approximately 380 service members followed by each of the service honor guards and, um, the u.s. army band as well as the marine corps band. and they will go past the president's location on the steps on the east front of the capitol. and once they complete the pass and review, then the presidential escort, they fall into the, um, the motorcade, and then they start the parade route. now, along the parade route we have approximately 2,300 military personnel participating in the parade. there are approximately 10,000 total personnel in the praild, and the way the parade is organized, there are five divisions in this parade. each division is led by a service component. so division one will be led by the army, division two by the marines, division three by the navy, division four by the air force and division five by a mixture of the coast guard and the merchant marines. and, essentially, it's comprised of military bands, service elements that represent the active, reserve and national guard components and
we agree that it is critical that the united states remain fully engaged, that we project not only the power of our military strength when necessary but the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and new demands we will inevitably face. there is no doubt you will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. before i recognize senator corker, let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done through your long and illustrious career here in the senate and in the chairman ship of this committee and in anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and god speed to many of the journeys that lie ahead and we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me now recognize senator corker, the ranking member, for his comments. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. i thank our three distinguished guests who are going to introduce the chairman in just a minute. i want to say to the chairman, i want t
the countries and businesses depend more on the banking system than they do here in the united states. why? because with a more developed capital market. and so that it was developed capital market, so although it is starting to develop more rapidly. and so the key as i said to getting them back to growth is the banking system. and so all the things i've mentioned here are very important. european central bank has put in the ltros, three-year loans at 1%. they did that a year ago. and now they've done the omb. they've lessened the amount of collateral necessary to par with european central banks. and the banking system there has been shedding assets because they had to raise additional capital. and they've income stream more on that been thinking, unfortunately, and a lot of you in this room are aware of that. and some of the benefactors of that, beneficiaries are japanese banks have been buying portfolios and investors like will up on the market. but we've got to get the european banks back up to lending. that is key to all of what i have said here. then i would just say a few words about
... >> cenegenics has a network of more than 100 affiliated doctors in the united states and joint ventures in tokyo, seoul, and hong kong. mintz says his roster of patients includes movie stars, las vegas entertainers, ceos, and the president of a foreign country, some of whom pay as much as $1,000 a month for the treatment. how much has your business grown? >> well, start with zero nine years ago, and it'll do $20 million this year. >> that's a pretty good practice. >> it's a very good practice. >> and you don't have to worry about medicare or medicaid. >> we don't ever want to talk to medicare and medicaid. >> no insurance to deal with. >> absolutely none. >> it's like the good old days. >> like the good old days. >> when we return, some doctors question the cenegenic system. >> i would not take growth hormone because it's unsafe. i would certainly not recommend to my family or my patients that they take growth hormone. >> on 60 minutes on cnbc. [ sniffs ] [ sneezes ] [ sniffles ] [ female announcer ] for everything your face has to face. face it with puffs facial tissues. puffs has air-fluffed p
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